Packing and clothing tips for a safari trip

img_0520When you think of a ‘safari wardrobe’, you probably have visions of people in head-to-toe khaki and that you need to shop at a safari outfitters store, but rest assured you don’t have to go out and buy a whole load of specialist clothes.

Pale (not white), earthy-tones cotton lightweight clothes that are comfortable to sit in for long periods of time are ideal. So before you hit the shops, go through your wardrobe with fresh eyes and collect up any suitable cotton tops, trousers, jumpers. Then work out what you need to get to supplement your haul.

Key pieces
There are some key items of clothing that you really do need for a safari trip:

  • Lightweight trousers
  • Shorts
  • Short sleeved tops/vests for layering
  • Long sleeved shirt
  • Long sleeved tops
  • Cotton jumper for the cool evenings
  • Hat (with broad brim preferably)
  • Scarf

And no bright colours – you may be on holiday and it’s sunny and hot so you may think that your usual holiday clothes will be perfect, but don’t wear your bright Hawaiian shirts or neon-coloured exercise clothes. They really do scare the animals!

Luggage restrictions
Many safari trips have luggage weight restrictions. This is because you may need to take a few light plane trips and large, bulky suitcases won’t fit in the luggage compartments. As every kilo counts, I suggest that you work out how many days you will be on safari, how many additional outfits you need (for dinner, non-safari activites) and then collect it all up and lay everything out on the bed. Then, remove anything that requires an additonal item e.g. a sheer blouse that needs a specific tank top/bra, a pair of trousers that only ‘go’ with one pair of shoes, etc. and see what you are left with. Essentially you want all the clothing to be multi-purpose and interchangeable, the tops you pack are the right length/fit for the trousers and the shorts, the jumper fits over the tops, etc.  I tend to pick a narrow colour range and stick to it. Much easier on safari!

Packing
Because you will be cramming things into every part of your luggage, use small bags to separate out your underwear from your clothes, to pack your shoes in, for your chargers. In fact use bags for everything. Much quicker when packing and unpacking at lodges and you are less likely to leave something behind.

Don’t pack anti-malarials and any other medication you may need in your checked luggage; put it in your hand luggage. Ditto car keys/house keys.

Power up
Check what travel adapters are required and pack a couple. Take spare batteries for your camera, and a portable charger for your smartphone/ebook reader. Keep all chargers and leads in one small bag in your hand luggage and try to always use the one power socket wherever you stay, preferably near your bag. I have lost count of the number of times I have left chargers in power sockets when leaving accommodation.

Day pack for game drives
You will be out on game drives for long periods of time so it’s good to get a good day pack together. Your bag should contain eye drops (dust?!), antibacterial gel, tissues, SPF lotion, ziplock bags (have I mentioned the dust?!), binoculars, camera, spare batteries, water, notepad and pencil, scarf, hat, jumper, sunglasses.

 

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Bland is so…bland – I had no idea I was a curry addict until…

Curries (royalty free image - Morguefile)
Curries (royalty free image – Morguefile)

So I am currently lying around at home recovering from throat surgery, a tonsillectomy. For those of you in the know, this is an incredibly painful procedure for adults and the recovery time is at least two weeks. Rest assured, this article will not be listing the horrors of my post-surgery life (trust me, you do NOT want to know, it’s bad) but I AM going to focus on one element of my current purgatory. Food.

Now I didn’t think I was a particularly adventurous or ‘different’ eater. My husband and I cook and eat out regularly, usually something Asian-inspired or Italian and sometimes we treat ourselves to a take-away pizza from our local (which is fabulous – inner-eastern dwellers of Melbourne, please check out Lina’s Pizza!) but I wouldn’t have said that I have ‘exotic’ tastes.

I have always taken for granted that I could eat whatever food I like; we are lucky enough to have a wonderful array of restaurants on our doorstep, Vietnamese, Burmese, Malaysian, Indian, Japanese, Thai, Italian. I would rate myself as an ‘above average’ cook and I have no food allergies so quite frankly, the world is my oyster. An average week of evening meals for me pre-surgery would have included a spicy veggie stir fry, a Malaysian, Indian or possibly Burmese curry, Cajun Salmon with some veggies, Pasta Puttenesca and/or maybe a thin crust pizza with prosciutto and mozzarella. Basically everything would have been spicy and/or tomatoey.

But post-surgery, oh how my culinary journey has been curtailed. I had no idea how exciting my diet was, what a wonderfully diverse range of cultures I could plunder for recipes, until now!!  Because right now I am restricted to bland, bland, bland. My throat is essentially raw; swallowing is painful and pretty much anything can set it aching and burning in the most upsetting way. So I have to play safe. Soup? Sure, but only if it is non-tomato based (ever cut your finger while slicing a tomato…imagine your entire throat feeling like that!). Pasta? Yep, but steady on, keep it plain, just a splash of olive oil and maybe a teeny sprinkling of parmesan. Stir fry? Why not but no chilli, ginger, garlic. Curry? Ha! I wish.  And did I mention the fact that even if I wanted a glass of wine (which I don’t!) I couldn’t; it’s not a good mix with the painkillers I am on plus I am pretty sure wine would hurt my throat just as much as tomato right now.

You may ask what on earth I have been eating for the last seven days and here it is. In all its glorious tedium:

  • wholemeal toast with a scraping of butter
  • porridge
  • pumpkin soup
  • poached eggs
  • baked potatoes
  • steamed vegetables (with no salt or pepper).

Oh, and before you ask why ice-cream isn’t on the list; let me tell you that it is an outright lie that you get to have ice-cream all the time after a tonsillectomy. Maybe that was the case in the good old days, but now you are expected to eat ‘normal meals’ straight away. And that means stuff that scrapes your throat but doesn’t ‘burn’. Plus you have to avoid excessive amounts of dairy as it – gross bit, apologies – creates mucus build up in the throat that can affect the healing process. In other words, no ice-cream.  I thought I could cheat with yoghurt, but nope, too acidic, thought my throat was on fire when I tried some.

A week on after surgery and although my appetite is finally starting to return and I am actively thinking about food again, unfortunately my throat is not playing ball; it is still way too sore to waver from the path of blandness. To distract myself as I chow down on yet another poached egg or plain baked potato (oh and did I mention that all of my food needs to be tepid – too hot and it’s like I am swallowing molten lava) I have made a list of all the food that I will be feasting on the moment my throat is healed (all washed down with the appropriate glass of wine or cider, rest assured!):

  • Lamb Rogan Josh with garlic naan
  • Chicken chilli & ginger stir fry
  • Stir fried rice
  • Tom Yum Soup or maybe a Laksa (or both!)
  • Chilli con carne
  • Dhal
  • Tapas such as patatas bravas, albondigas and chorizo
  • Every single tomato-based pasta sauce known to mankind
  • Chips (that would be ‘hot chips’ to Australians and ‘fries’ to Americans)
  • Salsa
  • Yoghurt
  • Brie, King Island Roaring Forties, in fact just cheese, cheese, cheese, cheese
  • Oranges, raspberries, rhubarb

So here’s to my swift recovery, ‘cos I have me some feasting to do!